Middle School Science Unit - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Middle School Science Unit. Understanding by Design (UbD) with Differentiated Instruction (DI). Presented

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Middle School Science Unit

Understanding by Design (UbD)with

Differentiated Instruction (DI)

Presented by Dr. John D. Hunt
  • Professor, Teacher Education
  • Mississippi College, Clinton, MS 39058
  • Email [email protected]
  • Web site –www.sciencefunday.org
  • Facebook – Science Fun Day
  • Twitter – JhuntDr
  • Cell # - 769-232-1976 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 1 – DESIRED RESULTS
  • 8th Grade Physical Science
  • Forces affect Motion
    • Investigate (with supporting details and diagrams) how kinetic energy of an object can be converted (the energy of position) or potential energy... (DOK 2)

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

UNDERSTANDINGSStudents will understand that…
  • There are various forms of energy
  • The amount of energy in an object varies
  • Knowledge of energy can be applied to real world situations 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
ESSENTIAL QUESTIONS
  • What is the difference between potential and kinetic energy?
  • How does the potential and kinetic energy vary in an object?
  • How can this lesson be applied to real-world situations? 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STUDENTS WILL KNOW…
  • That there is a difference between potential and kinetic energy.
  • That the amount of potential and kinetic energy an object has varies.
  • Potential and kinetic energy can be applied to real world situations. 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STUDENTS WILL BE ABLE TO…
  • Compare and contrast the differences between potential and kinetic energy.
  • Describe how potential and kinetic energy varies in an object.
  • Explain how potential and kinetic energy can be applied to real-world situations. 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 2 ASSESSMENT EVIDENCE PERFORMANCE TASKS
  • ROLE PLAY – The entire class will be broken into groups of two to investigate with and design their roller coaster. Once the students have reached a design, they will present it to the class as if they were contractors (R) presenting a proposal to an amusement park design board (A) wishing to make the safest and most exciting roller coaster (G) in the United States. The amusement park has had a very inactive season and the newest roller coaster is more than 10 years old (S); unless the design board is able to find an awesome design, the park will be forced to close. Since this is a preliminary design, the only criteria for initial acceptance of the proposal is that the coaster is exciting but safe (SC). Because of the recession, your contracting company really needs a bid, otherwise it may close down along with the amusement park; thus, failure is not an option (SC). 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
OTHER EVIDENCE
  • Prompts:
  • How does the height of the roller coaster at the beginning affect the available kinetic energy? (E)
  • How can you use the properties of kinetic and potential energy to make a more exciting roller coaster? (A)
  • Why should the concepts of potential and kinetic energy matter to you? (I)
  • How do you react to the various coasters you’ve ridden? Can certain coasters be too exciting (Em)
  • How do you know if you have properly applied your knowledge of potential and kinetic energy to the roller coaster you designed? (SK)
  • Given a constant ratio of the height of the coaster to it’s valleys and peaks, can the coaster be too large or too small? (P) 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
OTHER EVIDENCE
  • Observation:
  • Is the learner actively participating in the coaster design?
  • Is the body language indicating understanding?

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

OTHER EVIDENCE
  • Rubric:
  • Does the learner participate in the role playing activity?
  • Is the learner demonstrating interest in class material and discussion?

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

OTHER EVIDENCE
  • Work Sample:
  • Roller coaster design
  • Presentation of roller coaster

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • Learning Activities:
  • Once students sit down in their desks, they will take out a sheet of paper and write down what they think potential and kinetic is in their bell-ringer notebook. (H)
  • TTW tell students that during the lesson, they will be assigned a partner to work with to design a roller coaster. (W) to do so while making the roller coaster safe, they will need to know basic facts about potential and kinetic energy.11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • Learning Activities:
  • TTW have a brief discussion about potential and kinetic energy. Develop a class definition and write it on the whiteboard for both ideas. Examples follow:
  • Potential Energy – The energy of an object at rest
  • Kinetic Energy – The energy of an objects in motion11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • TTW divide students into pairs and have each get the materials for the lesson.
  • TLW consider the design of a roller coaster and attempt to make a coaster with at least three hills. (E) While the activity is occurring, TTW (at appropriate times) ask students the following:11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • What do you think affects the amount of potential energy the roller coaster will have?
  • What do you think is the safest way to travel down the first hill?
  • How do you think the coaster should come over the second hill? 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • How high should the consecutive hill be compared to the one before it?
  • How high should the previous hill be if a loop is to be on the coaster?
  • What would the safest shape of a loop be (circular or elliptical)? 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
STAGE 3 LEARNING PLAN
  • TLW draw their coaster designs out to scale and share their drawings with the class. Ask the students to point out the safest and most exciting designs. (E2)
  • TTW conclude the lesson by correcting any safety standards violations in their designs. (R ) Whatever mistakes are made should be reviewed in a summary paragraph.

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

WHITE CUBE (Facets of Understanding)
  • How does the height of the roller coaster at the beginning affect the available energy later on? (E)
  • How can you use the properties of kinetic and potential energy to make a more exciting roller coaster? (A)
  • Why should the concepts of potential and kinetic energy matter to you? (I)

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

WHITE CUBE (Facets of Understanding)
  • How do you react to the various coaster you’ve ridden? Aren’t some more exciting than others? Can certain coasters be too exciting? (Em)
  • How do you know if you’ve properly applied your knowledge of potential and kinetic energy to the roller coaster you designed? (SK)
  • Given a constant ratio of the height of the coaster to its valleys and peaks, can the coaster be too large or too small? (P)

11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt

Red Cube (Bloom’s Taxonomy)
  • Define kinetic and potential energy. (BK)
  • Give examples of situations where there is an object that displays kinetic energy and an object that has potential energy? (BC)
  • Construct a chart or graph that displays the change in potential energy of a ball rolling down a hill. (BA) 11/11/2011 AMLE Hunt
Red Cube (Bloom’s Taxonomy)
  • Create a diagram or drawing that compares and contrasts the basic differences between kinetic and potential energy. (BN)
  • Compose a plan for an investigation that would prove the concepts of potential and kinetic energy. (BS)
  • Describe how you would explain potential and kinetic energy to a younger sibling. (BE) 11/11/2011 AMLEHunt
ThinkDOTS (Sternberg’s Triarchic Theory)
  • Diagram how stored potential energy affects kinetic energy when it is released. (SA)
  • Based on your experience, explain how the concept of potential energy can be used. (SP)
  • Use unusual materials to explain potential and kinetic energy. (SC)

11/11/2011 AMLEHunt

ThinkDOTS (Sternberg’s Triarchic Theory)
  • Identify the key parts of potential and kinetic energy. (SA)
  • Demonstrate how someone uses the concept of potential and kinetic energy. (SP)
  • Become a spring and use your new perspective to help us think about potential energy. (SC) 11/11/2011 AMLEHunt

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